A Blue SucculentYou can easily create a peaceful, calm, and serene atmosphere with succulents in your home or yard.

They even come in shapes that match the color! A Succulent plant planted in various colors is a beautiful way to add individuality and beauty to any garden.

Keep reading as you will consider adding a few beautiful blue succulents to your collection, whether you have a specific color scheme in mind or appreciate the bright colors of nature.

13 Best Blue Succulents

These lovely blue succulents look fantastic in both indoor and outdoor settings. They’re also an excellent way to pop color to any part of your home or office, including your fairy gardens, living walls, table centerpieces, and more!

– Agave Potatorum Butterfly Agave

1. Agave Potatorum Butterfly Agave

This variety of agaves is a beautiful succulent native to the Mexican highlands. A thick rosette of beautiful, wide, grey-blue 18-inch-long leaves can reach two feet in height and three feet in diameter.

This Agave blooms in the summer when it is fully mature, with a flower stalk reaching 20 feet. It has pale green and yellow flowers with red borders on top.

The plant dies after blooming, and its life cycle is continued by its offsets, which can be repotted in their own container. This plant is ideal for a sunny position at home because of its small size if you can provide it with roughly 6 hours of sun and intense light.

Only water your Agave when the soil is completely dry. Plant in nutrient-deficient, free-draining, coarser soil and don’t fertilize.

This Agave will create a lovely focal point in your home without outgrowing its location too quickly. It grows well on a bit of neglect and dislikes being disturbed, which is ideal if you don’t want to fuss about your plant treasures. Ensure you are handling these plants with caution because this Agave produces stinging sap and sharp spines that aren’t fun to contact with.

– Echeveria Blue Prince

2. Echeveria Blue Prince

Echeveria’ is a gorgeous Mexican native with dark blue foliage bordered by red that looks like flowers. The thick leaves are covered in a fine granular residue and form a dense rosette.

This Echeveria retains its compact, dense appearance and deep dark blue color when grown in full sun. Echeveria’ blue prince’ produces stunning tulip-shaped pink to red flower clusters on a tall, thick stem from spring to summer.

Full sun is preferred. Echeveria thrives in intense sunlight; therefore, a window with southern exposure is ideal. Place your plant beneath a grow light or a fluorescent lamp if you don’t have enough natural light.

Echeveria requires relatively more minor water and well-draining soil. Ensure that the pot has a large drainage hole to allow any extra water to drain. You can leave your Echeveria outside in the summer but bring it inside before the first frost.

Around the mother plant, Echeveria develops a lot of offsets or “chicks.” They resemble a chicken with a brood of chicks grown together in the same pot, earning the plant the nickname “Mexican Hens and Chicks.” Offsets may be removed from the mother plant and put in their own pots once they’ve grown large enough.

– Agave Tequilana’ Blue Agave’

3. Agave Tequilana' Blue Agave'

If the word tequilana in the name intrigues you, we’re happy to let you know you are onto something! This fantastic plant produces a unique sap that has been used to make tequila in many South American cultures for centuries.

Agave tequilana “Blue Agave” is a magnificent evergreen succulent native to Mexico that is probably the most well-known of all blue succulents.

It has blue-grey lance-shaped leaves with a brown core spine and sharp tiny spines at the edges that are four feet long. A six-foot-tall rosette of leaves forms. This Agave grows a 20-feet-tall bloom stalk topped with 20 to 25 branches, green flowers, and purple stamens in five to eight years.

The plant dies once it has finished blooming. This Agave requires whole light and a temperature that never falls below freezing. It requires a small amount of water; grow it in poor, well-draining soil with plenty of coarse matter.

Agave plants produce several offsets, which can be utilized to reproduce the mother plant. Pick ones with well-established roots, then curl and twist them off the mother plant when they’re a few inches tall.

The sap from this Agave might irritate the skin, be cautious when repotting it. In Mexico, blue Agave is used to make tequila. Tequila is a distilled beverage prepared from the fermentation of sugars extracted from the cooked blue agave plant, the predominant sugar being fructose.

– Sedeveria Blue Burrito

The hybrid succulent Sedeveria Blue was created by combining Sedum morganianum with Echeveria peacockii.

It has a rosette of luscious blue-green leaves with pink tips. The rosette’s diameter can reach six inches. Each rosette is supported by long, extending stems reaching 12 inches in length. Sedeveria rosettes usually form a clump in containers.

Sedeveria “Blue Burrito” requires nutrient-poor, well-draining soil with an abundance of coarse matter. The best case is if you can give it six hours of full sun and bright light, it will thrive indoors. Do not water excessively and do not fertilize. Because only stones can grow as quickly as this plant, it’s also known as Stonecrop.

Stem cuttings are an easy way to propagate Sedeveria. Simply snip them off the mother plant and stick them in the pot.

– Senecio Mandraliscae Blue Chalksticks

4. Senecio Mandraliscae Blue Chalksticks

Blue Chalksticks, sometimes known as Blue Fingers, is a fascinating succulent that grows in cracks between rocks in South Africa. The leaves are vivid blue and resemble tiny fingers, growing up to 18 inches in length.

Farina is a finely powdered covering that protects them. Farina, also known as epicuticular wax, is a white powdery wax coating found on succulent stems and leaves.

It is beneficial to the health of succulents since it acts as a natural sunscreen and raincoat, reducing the risk of sunburn and root damage.

The delicate white blossoms of this plant bloom in mid-summer. Hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies love Blue Chalkstick, so if you’re growing it inside, put it on a windowsill where it can get full sun for five to six hours.

This plant requires very little water and can go without it for an extended period. Plant it in quick-draining soil that does not retain moisture. It’s best to use a cactus or succulent commercial soil mix. As with most other succulents, this plant also requires infrequent watering only when it seems to be dried.

This plant spreads through subterranean roots and produces a ground cover when planted in the garden. It’s easy to propagate by clipping new plants as they emerge and placing them in a new container.

– Echeveria Blue Bird

5. Echeveria Blue Bird

Echeveria’ blue bird’ has little blue rosettes that resemble flowers and is a gorgeous, delicate-looking succulent. Let the offsets grow in the same container; they can make stunning little blue clumps.

One rosette can grow up to 10 inches in diameter if left alone in the pot. Farina, a thin powdery coating that gives leaves a velvety appearance, is applied to the leaves.

This specimen prefers full sun, although it can also tolerate light shade. It requires a lot of bright light or a grow lamp when grown indoors. Only give water to the plant when the soil is entirely dry.

Fertilizing isn’t necessary. Plant your plant on well-draining, nutrient-poor soil that does not retain water to avoid overwatering. Cut the young offsets and place them in their own pot to reproduce the blue echeveria blue bird.

– Stonecrop Blue Spruce

Stonecrop, also known as Sedum reflexum’ blue spruce’, is an unusual evergreen perennial with blue-green needle-like leaves that grows low.

The leaves are attached to stems that resemble spruce needles. This gorgeous succulent blooms throughout the summer, producing bright yellow flowers that resemble small stars.

This sedum requires little water, bright light, and full sun to grow and requires little care. It makes an excellent cover when cultivated in the garden. It requires a sunny place near a window with southern exposure, free-draining soil, and very little fertilizer when grown in a container inside.

It produces a magnificent succulent arrangement when coupled with a more giant blue, taller succulent in a larger pot.

 

– Aloe Blue Sky

Aloe’ blue sky’ is a beautiful succulent with large pale blue leaves and orange spikes on the edges. The leaves in the rosette’s center are substantially smaller.

This aloe thrives in whole light and temperatures ranging from 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. (21 to 26 degrees Celsius). Its hue becomes more brilliant as it receives more light. Keep your aloe near a southern-facing window if possible.

Only water this succulent until the soil is dried, and then soak it thoroughly. Allow extra water to drain before replanting your aloe in its usual location.

The gorgeous orange flowers of the aloe appear in the spring and summer, and they can survive until the fall.

They attract bees and hummingbirds, and you should plant your aloe on the balcony or deck when it is in bloom.

Once offsets are an inch or two tall and have a solid root system, this aloe is easy to reproduce using offsets. Leaf cuttings and seeds can also be used to grow this aloe.

– Aloe Blue Elf

6. Aloe Blue Elf

The evergreen hybrid succulent Aloe Elf has narrow blue-grey leaves that grow vertically in a dense rosette. Orange spikes run around the edges of the leaves.

This aloe is a strong, easy-to-care-for, sun- and heat-loving plant that grows upright mainly, making it ideal for a small space at home. It looks great next to low-growing, spreading succulents. Aloe “Blue Elf” produces orange stems with gorgeous orange flowers in late winter and early spring.

If you keep offsets in the same pot as the mother plant, they may all bloom simultaneously, resulting in a spectacular display of color. This aloe could bloom at any time of year if the conditions are right. Keep your aloe near a window with plenty of light and southern exposure. Your aloe’s leaves will have a subtle red hue if it gets enough sun.

Plant your aloe in free-draining, nutrient-poor soil. It dislikes having its roots submerged in water. Ensure that the pot has a large drainage hole and that any surplus water is allowed to drain freely. Water once the soil is completely dry.

– Mangave Tooth Fairy

The tooth fairy is a stunning succulent with large, triangular-shaped silver-blue leaves framed by a rainbow of visible teeth ranging from chocolate brown to vibrant orange.

Mangave, as you may have already guessed from the name, is a portmanteau. This plant is a cross between Agave and manfreda that grows more quickly than Agave but doesn’t die after flowering.

You have a dramatic focal point for your blue succulent collection when you add that soft cranberry-colored spot on the slightly bent leaves.

It might bloom every summer if you give it adequate intense light and six hours of sun, a hot, dry atmosphere, and free-draining soil.

This Mangave does not grow as quickly indoors as it does in the yard; it rarely achieves a height of 12 inches and a diameter of 10 inches.

It does not require repotting regularly. It’s okay to do it every two to three years or whenever you notice roots emerging from the drainage hole.

– Corpuscularia Lehmannii

The Ice Plant, Corpuscularia lehmanii, is a peculiar succulent with blue-green fleshy leaves shaped like ice cubes. They grow in pairs on a stalk and have a strange three-sided triangular form.

This plant can reach a height of eight inches. Each branch produces a gorgeous daisy-shaped yellow flower in the summer.

This South African native thrives in a hot, dry climate with plenty of sunshine. Please ensure that you only water it when the soil is dry. Branch cuttings can be used to grow the ice plant. From a branch, cut three to six-inch-long cuts.

All except the top two leaves should be removed. Allow the cutting to dry for at least one night. Each cutting should be planted in its own pot, in a cactus or succulent soil mix.

– Pilosocereus Azureus Blue Torch Cactus

7. Pilosocereus Azureus Blue Torch Cactus

Also known as Pilosocereus Azureus, this is a stunning silvery-blue tree-like pillar cactus plant with long, bright yellow spines.

As this succulent matures, the blue color deepens and becomes more striking. This cactus, which is native to Brazil, has tree-like branches. It grows quickly and can reach a height of 33 feet.

It will remain room-size for a few years before being relocated to the garden and replaced by its offspring. Pilosocereus Azureus is a low-maintenance plant that is easy to grow. It requires full sun, a hot and dry climate, and light irrigation.

Plant it in a succulent or cactus soil mix that drains well and only water when the soil is completely dry. Make sure it’s well watered and that any extra water drains appropriately. The magnificent, enormous white flowers and fruit of this plant bloom at night. To reproduce your cactus, take seeds from the fruits.

– Creeping Blue Sedum

This sedum has a lovely blue and pink color combination. The plant has fleshy circular leaves with pink borders that are blue-grey in color. Sedum thrives in full to partial sunlight.

Taller hybrids demand full sun to flower correctly, whereas creeping varieties can survive and grow well in partial shade. Sedums love well-drained soil with a pH range of neutral to slightly alkaline. Root and stem rot can be caused by wet, heavy clay.

Comparison Table

Plant Name Why Get Them
Agave Potatorum Butterfly Agave Beautiful succulent with a rosette of beautiful, broad, grey-blue leaves can reach upto two feet in height and three feet in diameter.
Echeveria Blue Prince Echeveria is gorgeous with dark blue foliage lined in red that looks like flowers.  
Agave Tequilana ‘Blue Agave’ This fantastic plant produces a unique sap that has been used to make tequila in many South American cultures for centuries.
Sedeveria Blue Burrito Has a rosette of luscious blue-green leaves with pink tips.
Senecio Mandraliscae Blue Chalksticks A fascinating succulent that grows in cracks between rocks with vivid blue leaves that resemble tiny fingers.
Echeveria Blue Bird Echeveria’ blue bird’ has little blue rosettes that resemble flowers and is a gorgeous, delicate-looking succulent.
Stonecrop Blue Spruce Stonecrop is an unusual evergreen perennial with blue-green needle-like leaves that grows low.
Aloe Blue Sky Aloe’ blue sky’ is a beautiful succulent with large pale blue leaves and orange spikes on the edges.
Aloe Blue Elf The evergreen hybrid succulent Aloe Elf has narrow blue-grey leaves and orange spikes running around the leaves’ edges.
Mangave Tooth Fairy The tooth fairy is a stunning succulent with large, triangular-shaped silver-blue leaves framed by a rainbow of visible teeth.
Corpuscularia Lehmannii A peculiar succulent with blue-green fleshy leaves shaped like ice cubes.
Pilosocereus Azureus Blue Torch Cactus A stunning silvery-blue tree-like pillar cactus plant with long, bright yellow spines.
Creeping Blue Sedum It has a lovely blue and pink color combination and fleshy circular leaves with pink borders that are blue-grey in color.

Conclusion

a beautiful Blue SucculentIsn’t it time you expand your succulent collection with a few blue beauties? There are several reasons we could list off stating why getting your hands on succulents is a must;

however, we’ll just leave you with these few key points to keep in mind;

  • Succulents are excellent because they require minimal care and effort on your part.
  • Succulents across the board have very easy to keep up with watering requirements.
  • Piggy-backing off the previous point, because they need so little water, succulents can survive and thrive in pretty much any climate.
  • Succulents are gorgeous yet low-profile enough to be a decorative piece everywhere in your home.

Whether you have an indoor space or an outdoor garden, these succulent plants will add a soothing blue hue to your present color scheme.

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