Types of evergreen trees provide invaluable winter interest and year-round greenery in our gardens. We’ll cover some beautiful evergreen trees that thrive in different conditions so you’re sure to find the perfect choices for your yard.19 Types of Evergreen Trees

Whether you want curb appeal, privacy screening, fall color, or interesting needle shapes, we’ll outline the best evergreen trees to meet your specific landscape needs. So dive in and find the perfect trees to transform your outdoor space today!

Types of Evergreen Trees for Your Lush Landscape

1. Colorado Blue SpruceGrowing Colorado Blue Spruce

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Needle like
  • Aromatic
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Good drainage
Common pests
  • Spruce budworms
  • Cooley spruce gall

The Colorado Blue Spruce is a stunning evergreen tree native to the mountainous regions of Colorado. It grows tall and majestic, reaching heights of up to 100 feet with a broad pyramidal shape. Its thin, wispy branches support silvery blue needles that range from one to one and a half inches in length. These blue-hued needles provide a fragrant, ornamental element to landscapes all year long thanks to Colorado Blue Spruce’s status as a true evergreen.

The silvery blue needles combined with the tree’s tall, imposing form make the Colorado Blue Spruce a picturesque sight and a widely used ornamental conifer. It prefers full sun conditions and well-drained, slightly acidic soil for optimal growth.

Once established, the Colorado Blue Spruce requires minimal care and is fairly pest and disease resistant. Colorado Blue Spruce trees grow at a moderate rate, around 12 to 24 inches per year, with proper care and optimal growing conditions.

While requiring large spaces due to its towering size at maturity, the Colorado Blue Spruce stands as an iconic symbol of evergreen hardiness, natural beauty, and rugged grace. The combinations of height, fragrant foliage, and year-round color elevate the Colorado Blue Spruce as an attractive specimen for larger landscapes and conservation plantings.

2. Eastern White PineGrowing Season for Eastern White Pine

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Long
  • Needle like
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Moist soil
Common pests
  • White flies
  • Pine needles

The eastern white pine is a majestic evergreen tree native to North America. Often growing to heights exceeding 100 feet, the eastern white pine can become a towering focal point in any landscape.

The tree’s long, soft needles are arranged in clusters of five and range from four to eight inches in length. As the needles emerge, they are light green in color but slowly mature to a distinctive blue-green hue. This combination of soft, blue-green needles creates an airy, feathery effect that lends a graceful beauty and natural elegance to the eastern white pine tree.

While the eastern white pine is relatively pest and disease resistant compared to other pine species, it does require regular pruning and maintenance. The lower branches of young trees should be removed to create clearance from the ground for ornamental purposes. This pruning also promotes vertical growth of the tall, straight trunk that is characteristic of mature specimens.

3. Douglas FirLeaf Size of Douglas Fir

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Flattened
  • Needle like
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Good drainage
Common pests
  • Western spruce bud
  • Japanese beetles

The Douglas fir is an impressive evergreen conifer native to western North America. It is renowned for its immense size, ranking as one of the largest tree species in the world. Mature Douglas fir trees can tower over 300 feet high with thick, sturdy trunks up to 10 feet in diameter.

The foliage of the Douglas fir consists of flattened, slightly twisted needles that are arranged singly along the branches. The needles vary in length from half to one and a half inches and are blue-green in color, producing a soft, feathery appearance. As the needles age, they turn a darker yellow-green hue. New growth occurs at the end of branches each spring.

4. Norway SpruceSpecific Needs of Norway Spruce

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Long
  • Needle like
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Good drainage
Common pests
  • European spruce sawfly
  • Thrips

The majestic Norway spruce is a tree well suited for colder climates and low-maintenance landscapes. Native to northern Europe and Scandinavia, this hardy evergreen has adapted to withstand harsh weather conditions like extreme cold, snow, and wind.

The Norway spruce has a distinctive pyramidal form, growing upward in a dense, conical shape. Drooping branches clad in short, stiff needles give the tree a moderately coarse texture compared to other spruces. The lower branches often spread horizontally, contributing to the tree’s compact form. The needles are a vibrant dark green on top and feature two reflective lighter green bands on the underside.

Once established, the Norway spruce demands little care beyond the occasional pruning to maintain its size and pyramidal shape. This tree is extremely tough and resilient, tolerating temperatures that fall as low 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Norway spruce trees can live for centuries, with some specimens surviving for over 500 years. Mature trees reach heights up to 130 feet tall with trunks spanning three to six feet wide.

5. American HollyCommon Pests in American Holly

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Flattened
  • Needle like
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Good Drainage
Common pests
  • Western spruce bud
  • Japanese beetles

The American holly (Ilex opaca) is an iconic broadleaf evergreen tree native to Eastern North America and valued for its ornamental foliage, winter berries, and dense growth habit.

American holly trees have dark green, leathery, spinyl leaves with serrated edges that give the tree a textured, prickly appearance. The leaves are alternate and obovate in shape, typically measuring one to three inches long. Holly leaves are waxy and thick, allowing the tree to tolerate hot, humid summers and cold winters.

In spring, American holly produces small, greenish-yellow flowers that are inconspicuous. However, mature trees produce clusters of bright red berries in fall and winter that persist into the new year, providing food for birds. The red berries contrast vibrantly against the holly’s dark evergreen foliage.

American holly grows at a slow to medium rate and is both heat and drought tolerant once established. The tree ultimately matures between 30 and 50 feet tall with a broad, rounded crown. The wood of holly trees is very hard and resilient, making it desirable for tool handles, sports equipment, and carvings.

The holly’s dense, prickly foliage remains ornamental throughout winter while its red berries provide wildlife forage and winter interest. With minimal care needs, the American holly thrives in a range of conditions yet remains an instantly recognizable symbol of winter holidays.

6. White SpruceGrowing White Spruce Outdoor

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Long
  • Needle-like
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Good drainage
  • Moist soil
Common pests
  • Spruce gall adelgid
  • Whiteflies

The white spruce is a native North American evergreen tree that is well suited for landscape uses such as privacy screens, windbreaks, and ornamental specimens. Native ranges extend from Alaska through Canada and into the northern United States.

White spruce trees can grow quite large, reaching heights up to 100 feet at maturity with an irregular pyramidal or conic shape. Their soft, blue-green needles (ranging from half to one inch long) arranged in spiral patterns on the branches create an airy, feathery texture. New growth occurs at the end of branchlets each spring.

The white spruce prefers well-drained, moderately moist soil and full sun exposure for optimal growth, though it can tolerate partial shade. Proper pruning and training of young white spruce trees help develop a strong structural form with fewer, higher branches that are spaced appropriately. Such pruning practices also allow for more sunlight and airflow within the crown of the tree.

7. Eastern Red CedarSpecific Needs of Eastern Red Cedar

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Scaly
  • Needle-like
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Dry soil
Common pests
  • Cedar apple rust
  • Cedar leaf blight

The eastern red cedar is a native evergreen tree well suited to harsh environments and arid conditions. It derives its common name from the distinctive reddish hue of its durable wood, which darkens with age.

Eastern red cedars are known for their shredding bark and scale-like needles, which vary from a bluish gray to grayish green in color. The needles — actually modified leaves — are arranged in overlapping scales that give the foliage a frosted appearance. New growth occurs each spring for this tree.

The eastern red cedar thrives in full sun and dry soil, making it a drought-tolerant choice for landscapes. It can survive in areas with as little as 15 inches of annual rainfall and has developed adaptations like waxy coatings on its needles to reduce moisture loss. As a result, the eastern red cedar is well suited to occupy exposed, harsh sites where other trees would struggle.

Once established, the eastern red cedar requires little care. It is long-lived for a conifer, often persisting for centuries as an evergreen foundation in uneven-aged stands. Mature specimens can reach heights up to 60 feet with trunk diameters approaching two feet.

8. Italian CypressCare Guide for Italian Cypress

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Long needles
  • Leaves in bundles
Specific needs
  • Full soil
  • Dry soil
Common pests
  • Pine sawfly
  • Pine shoot beetle

The Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) is a striking evergreen conifer tree valued for its gracefully tapering form, vertical emphasis, and Mediterranean origins. Native to the eastern Mediterranean region, Italian cypress trees have been cultivated for centuries in classic Italian gardens and villas due to their architectural elegance.

Italian cypress grows in a tall, slender columnar shape with a narrow crown of branches that radiate outward from the trunk. The branches are clothed in small scale-like foliage that overlaps, creating the tree’s signature conical form. The leaves are an aromatic pale green to grayish green color and can persist for up to five years, contributing to the tree’s dense, textured appearance.

Italian cypress trees mature to heights over 100 feet tall but often remain more shrub-like when grown in containers. As the species name Sempervirens suggests, Italian cypresses remain evergreen year-round in areas with mild winters. The tree’s soft wood is highly resistant to rot and decay.

An iconic feature of Italian cypress is their warm cinnamon to reddish-brown bark which often flakes and exfoliates with age, exposing the lighter color beneath and adding visual interest. Italian cypress trees prefer free-draining soil and minimal supplemental watering once established.

With minimum maintenance needs and adaptability to a variety of conditions, the Italian cypress continues to be considered one of the most majestic and graceful trees worldwide.

9. White FirGrowing Season for White Fir

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Flat
  • Blunt needles
Specific needs
  • Partial shade
  • Moist soil
Common pests
  • White fir needleminer
  • Beetles

The white fir is an attractive evergreen tree native to western North America. It derives its name from the whitish underside of its flat, soft needles, which give the tree a feathery appearance.

White fir trees have a conical crown when young that broadens with age. Mature specimens can reach towering heights over 160 feet tall with trunks up to four feet in diameter. The branches are arranged in horizontal tiers, creating the tree’s classic conic shape.

The white fir prefers growing conditions with partial shade and access to consistent moisture. It thrives in moist, well-drained soil but cannot tolerate prolonged flooding. Proper site selection and aftercare are important to ensure healthy growth and minimize pest issues for this fir species.

One of the primary threats facing white fir trees is needleminer damage. Adult needle miners lay eggs on the needles, which hatch into larvae that burrow inside and feed on the internal tissue. This often results in defoliation of large sections of the tree’s crown. Regular monitoring and treatment can help control needle miner infestations.

10. Alberta SpruceLeaf Type of Alberta Spruce

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Needle-like
  • Flat work blunt edges
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Good drainage
Common pests
  • Spruce budworm
  • Bore mites

The Alberta spruce is a desirable small evergreen tree prized for its ornamental appeal and compact form. Most Alberta spruce trees grow to heights between 30 and 40 feet at maturity, making them ideal for residential gardens and smaller yards. The branches are arranged in tiers, forming a narrow conic shape. The grayish green needles emerge from the branches at sharp angles, giving off a pleasant spicy fragrance when crushed or brushed against.

The Alberta spruce can tolerate a range of conditions, though it performs best in partial shade and moist, slightly acidic soil rich in organic matter. Proper pruning and training when the tree is young is important to maintain its small stature and desirable narrow form at maturity. Regular pruning throughout the life of the tree may be needed to prevent overly thick lower branches from developing.

11. Scots PineGrowing Scots Pine Indoor

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Long needles
  • Leaves in bundles
Specific needs
  • Full soil
  • Dry soil
Common pests
  • Pine sawfly
  • Pine shoot beetle

The Scots pine is a hardy evergreen tree native to Northern Europe and parts of Western Asia. It derives its common name from Scotland, where it is widespread and often used commercially for timber production.

Mature Scots pine trees can reach heights up to 100 feet tall with trunk diameters ranging from three to six feet. The tree develops a broad, rounded crown of spreading branches covered in long, thin needles that emerge in bundles of two. The needles are bluish green in color and often twisted, creating a shaggy, feathered appearance.

The Scots pine prefers dry, infertile, sandy soils and grows best in full sun conditions. It has a robust root system that helps anchor the tree in dry, exposed sites where other pines might struggle to survive. Proper pruning and training when the tree is young is important to produce a stronger structural form with a clear branching habit as the Scots pine matures.

Once established, the Scots pine requires little maintenance beyond the occasional pruning to maintain its shape and remove dead or diseased wood. It is relatively pest-resistant and long-lived, with some specimens exceeding 400 years of age.

12. Leyland CypressBest Season for Leyland Cypress

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Scaly
  • Needle-like
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Good drainage
Common pests
  • Bagworms
  • Cypress tip moth

The Leyland cypress is a hybrid evergreen tree prized for its high growth rate, pest resistance, and dense, leathery appearance. It was developed by crosses between various cypress species in the 19th century at Hareston near Lancaster, England by plantsman Francis Leyland.

Leyland cypress trees grow rapidly, ultimately reaching heights between 40 and 80 feet tall depending on the cultivar. Their scale-like needles are dark green and overlap like shingles, giving the branched a thick, dense texture. The closely spaced whorls of branches create a columnar form in younger trees that broadens with age.

It is highly resistant to most diseases and pests, making it a relatively low-maintenance evergreen choice. Proper pruning when young helps develop a stronger structure with good branching angles to promote upward growth. However, once established, the Leyland cypress requires little care beyond occasional trimming and shaping.

13. Western Red CedarLeaf Type of Western Red Cedar

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Leafy greens
  • Scaly
Specific needs
  • Partial shade
  • Moist soil
Common pests
  • Flatheaded fir borer
  • Western red cedar borer

The western red cedar is a majestic evergreen tree native to western North America. Renowned for its immense size potential, western red cedars can ultimately tower over 230 feet tall, ranking among the largest native tree species in the Pacific Northwest region.

The foliage of mature western red cedar trees consists of small, scale-like leaves that are tightly arranged along the branches. The young leaves emerge lime green before maturing to a dull green color. The trees also develop characteristically rich, reddish-brown bark that thickens with age.

The western red cedar prefers growing conditions with partial shade and access to consistent moisture. It thrives in acidic soil high in organic matter with adequate drainage. Proper siting and aftercare are important to promote healthy growth and minimize pest problems for this large conifer.

Once established, the western red cedar requires relatively little maintenance beyond occasional pruning to maintain its shape and size. Despite its massive stature, the western red cedar is a long-lived tree that can persist for centuries. Its aromatic, decay-resistant wood also makes it an economically valuable timber species.

14. Balsam FirCommon Pests in Balsam Fir

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Blunt needles
  • Oval
Specific needs
  • Partial soil
  • Moist soil
Common pests
  • Balsam twig aphid
  • Western spruce gall adelgid
  • Bean leaf beetles

The balsam fir is a fragrant evergreen tree native to North America. It derives its name from the aromatic, balsam-like resin produced by the tree, which emits a strong piney scent, especially when the foliage or limbs are crushed or broken.

Balsam fir trees have dark green, flattened needles that measure between half and one inch in length. The needles lay flat against the branches, giving the tree a fairly horizontal, sparse appearance compared to other firs. The needles remain on the tree for roughly two years before falling off.

The balsam fir thrives in partial shade and moist, acidic soil rich in organic material. Consistent access to moisture is important, as the balsam fir’s shallow root system makes it susceptible to drought stress. Proper pruning and training of young trees help develop a strong structure with good branching angles to facilitate upward growth.

Once established, the balsam fir requires little maintenance beyond occasional trimming and shaping. The tree’s aromatic, resinous wood and pleasant piney fragrance make it a popular choice for Christmas trees and balsam-scented handicrafts.

15. Red PineCare Guide for Red Pine

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Leaves are paired
  • Leaves in bundles
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Dry soil
Common pests
  • Red pine scale
  • Pine false webworm

The red pine is a native evergreen tree of eastern North America that is valued for its landscape uses as a specimen tree, windbreak, or privacy screen.

Red pine trees can ultimately grow quite large, reaching heights up to 100 feet at maturity. Their long needles, ranging from three to five inches in length, emerge from the branches in bundles of two. This characteristic needle arrangement gives the tree a feathery texture. The needles are a distinctive reddish-brown color, contributing to the tree’s common name.

The red pine prefers dry, sandy soils and grows best in full sun conditions. Adequate space is required to allow for proper branching and structural development. Proper pruning and thinning of lower branches when the tree is young helps promote upward growth and develop a strong structure. Regular pruning throughout the life of the red pine may also be needed to maintain its shape and size.

Once established, the red pine requires little maintenance beyond periodic pruning. However, the shallow root system of the red pine makes it susceptible to wind damage. The species is also prone to damage from insects like pine weevils and pine sawflies.

16. Canadian HemlockGrowing Canadian Hemlock

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Parallel leaf lines
  • Flat needles
Specific needs
  • Partial shade
  • Moist soil
Common pests
  • Hemlock looper
  • Hemlock rust

The Canadian hemlock is a majestic evergreen tree native to the northern forests of North America. It derives its common name from its natural distribution across Canada and parts of the northern United States.

Canadian hemlock trees have flat, dark green needles that are arranged in two parallel lines along the branches, giving the tree a feathery appearance. The needles are between half to one and a half inches in length and remain on the tree for around five years before falling off.

The Canadian hemlock prefers partial shade and soil conditions that remain consistently moist. It grows best in acidic, organic-rich soils that offer sufficient moisture while providing adequate drainage. Proper siting and regular pruning/thinning are important to help develop and maintain the tree’s dense, conical shape.

Once established, the Canadian hemlock requires relatively little maintenance beyond occasional pruning to improve the form, structure, and wind resistance of the tree. Despite its large size potential — mature specimens can reach heights over 160 feet tall — the Canadian hemlock is long-lived, with lifespans often exceeding 400 years.

17. Cypress TreesGreen Cypress Trees

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Fall
Leaf type
  • Leaves are paired
  • Leaves in bundles
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Dry soil
Common pests
  • Pine scale
  • Pine false webworm

Cypress trees are an iconic evergreen species prized for their striking conical shape and ability to thrive in a wide range of conditions. Often associated with coastal or wetland environments, cypress species can actually flourish in forests, prairies, and deserts due to their adaptability.

Most cypress trees have scale-like needles or small scale-shaped leaves that overlap in orderly rows all around the branches. This creates the trees’ trademark symmetrical conical form. Cypress foliage is typically a grayish-green to blue-green color and by reducing surface area, this allows the trees to minimize moisture loss.

In addition to their attractive form, many cypress trees also boast reddish to cinnamon-colored bark that often becomes fibrous and distinctive with age. The soft wood of cypress is lightweight yet durable and highly rot resistant, making it a valuable timber species and historically important for building purposes.

While some cypress species attain heights over 100 feet, many remain smaller trees with narrow crowns, producing elegant and often sculptural shapes. Drought tolerant once established, cypress trees require little ongoing maintenance beyond periodic pruning of lower branches to maintain their form.

In summary, cypress trees offer symbolic value, aesthetic appeal, and adaptability as landscape specimens. Their conical shape, fine yet durable textured foliage, ornamental bark and aromatic wood have made cypress trees desirable for gardens, parks and other greenspaces for millennia. With minimal water needs and easy care once planted, cypress trees remain valuable additions to both formal and naturalistic landscapes worldwide.

18. Bald CypressGrowing Bald Cypress

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
Leaf type
  • Scaly
  • Conifer
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Wet soil
Common pests
  • Cypress canker
  • Cypress leafroller

The bald cypress is a majestic deciduous conifer native to the southeastern United States. Renowned for its ability to thrive in wet environments, the bald cypress can ultimately grow quite large, reaching heights up to 120 feet tall at maturity.

The bald cypress has reddish-brown, fibrous bark that often develops “knees,” which are gnarled projections that emerge from the roots. Its scale-like leaves are arranged spirally along the branches, giving the tree a unique textured and feathered appearance. The leaves are lime green in color on young trees and turn rusty brown before shedding in winter.

The bald cypress thrives in wet soil conditions and under full sun exposure, allowing it to populate floodplains, swamps, and other water-logged habitats. It is renowned for its adaptations to periodically flooded environments, including the ability to produce oxygenating tissue and shed leaves before becoming submerged.

Once established, the bald cypress requires very little maintenance. It is remarkably resilient and long-lived, with some specimens known to survive for over 1,500 years. Despite its coniferous characteristics, the bald cypress undergoes typical seasonal leaf fall in autumn like broadleaf deciduous trees.

19. Japanese Black PineCare Guide for Japanese Black Pine

Growing season
  • Spring
  • Summer
Leaf type
  • Dark green spines
  • Clustered needles
Specific needs
  • Full sun
  • Good drainage
Common pests
  • Pine needle scale
  • Pine bark adelgid

The Japanese black pine is an ornamental evergreen tree renowned for its elegant, graceful form and climate resilience. Native to East Asia, this pine species has become widely cultivated as a landscape specimen beyond its native range.

Japanese black pine trees exhibit weeping branches that arc downward and sweep the ground, imbuing the tree with a graceful, winding habit. The dark green needles grow in clustered tufts along the pendulous branches, measuring three to five inches in length. The needles often mature to a slightly brownish hue that contrasts handsomely with the dark branches.

The Japanese black pine thrives in full sun exposures and well-drained soils, though it is remarkably tolerant of diverse conditions. The tree is well adapted to urban environments thanks to its inherent hardiness and climate resilience.

Once established, the Japanese black pine requires very little maintenance beyond occasional pruning to maintain its naturally graceful shape. The tree’s unique weeping branch structure and tufted needle clusters make it a popular ornamental choice, valued for its elegant form and textural contrast.

Conclusion

Evergreens thrive in difficult conditions and require only a little care once established, making them low-maintenance landscape additions.

  • Blue spruces provide classic pyramidal shapes and soft, feathery textures.
  • Columnar junipers make excellent privacy screens or narrow specimens for smaller yards.
  • Deciduous conifers like dawn redwood add seasonal interest with their colorful foliage in fall.

Although evergreen trees provide year-round greenery, each one has distinct qualities that can add unique beauty and seasonal interest to your yard or garden. With proper care and placement based on their specific needs, any of these versatile evergreens will enhance your landscape for many years to come!

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Evergreen Seeds